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Interfaith

Anti-Semitism Update

Long Beach Interfaith Council

     PAX CHRISTI *Long Beach Island  chapter 

                                                       ~ Catholic  peace & justice movement                                                                                    

                           Box 304, Point Lookout NY 11569  *peacelongbeach@optonline.net

                  **********************************************************************************

 

(We call on Catholic Pastors to provide the guidance they are called upon to give by the admonition of the USCCB by placing these insights of Pope Francis in the Sunday Bulletins as noted, adapting them for the Prayer of the Faithful & sermon topics )

 

July 3rd                                  Politics Serves the Common Good

 

As we live out this Jubilee Year of Mercy and the United States enters into the 2016 election season, Americans face a myriad of choices between competing visions for our nation's future. As Catholics, we are called by our faith to engage in this election. Pope Francis says that "a good Catholic meddles in politics, offering the best of one's self so that those who govern can govern well."

 

Politics, Pope Francis says, "is one of the highest forms of love, because it is in the service of the common good." He called on us to orient our politics based on the Christian models of Dorothy Day, Thomas Merton, and Martin Luther King

 

August 7th (Hiroshima & Nagasaki)      Global Peacemaking

 

As we live out this Jubilee Year of Mercy and the United States enters into the 2016 election season, Americans face a myriad of choices between competing visions for our nation's future.

 

"I appeal forcefully to all those who sow violence and death by force of arms: in the person you today see simply as an enemy to be beaten, discover rather your brother or sister, and hold back your hand! Give up the way of arms and go out to meet the other in dialogue, pardon and reconciliation, in order to rebuild justice, trust, and hope around you!"-Pope Francis (World Day of Peace, 2014)

 

"We bring about the rebirth of Cain in every act of violence & in every War. All of us! ... let us all become, in every place men & women of reconciliation n& peace". Vigil of prayer for peace 2013

 

"Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God." Pope Francis said "Peacemaking calls for courage, much more so than warfare."

 

Pope Francis said "war is the negation of all rights and a dramatic assault on the environment;" and "justice can never be wrought by killing a human being."

Pope Francis boldly proclaims "the true force of the Christian is the force of truth and of love, which means rejecting all violence. Faith and violence are incompatible!"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 4th (Labor Day Weekend)         The Economy

 

As we live out this Jubilee Year of Mercy and the United States enters into the 2016 election season, Americans face a myriad of choices between competing visions for our nation's future.

 

"Among our tasks as witnesses to the love of Christ is that of giving voice to the cry of the poor". ~ Pope Francis 

 

"Just as the commandment "Thou shalt not kill" sets a clear limit in order to safeguard the value of human life, today we also have to say "thou shalt not" to an economy of exclusion and inequality. Such an economy kills. Money must serve, not rule!"-Pope Francis (Evangelii Gaudium 53)

 

 

October 2nd (St. Francis of Assisi 4th)  

    The Environment

 

As we live out this Jubilee Year of Mercy and the United States enters into the 2016 election season, Americans face a myriad of choices between competing visions for our nation's future.

 

"It is my profound conviction that the future of the human family depends also on how we safeguard - both prudently and compassionately, with justice and fairness - the gift of creation that our Creator has entrusted to us."-Pope Francis (Common Declaration of Pope Francis and the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, May 25, 2014)

 

Pope Francis spoke earlier this year about our global failure to live up to this mission. "Humanity has slapped God in the face," the Pope said. "We have taken possession of nature and Mother Earth. God always forgives; we humans sometimes forgive; but nature never forgives. I believe that humanity has gone a bit too far. Thank God that today many, many people are talking about it."

 

 "If you want to cultivate peace," Benedict famously said, "protect creation."

 

October 9th (Columbus Day)       Immigration and Refugees

 

As we live out this Jubilee Year of Mercy and the United States enters into the 2016 election season, Americans face a myriad of choices between competing visions for our nation's future.

 

"We, the people of this continent, are not fearful of foreigners, because most of us were once foreigners. I say this to you as the son of immigrants, knowing that so many of you are also descended from immigrants. When the stranger in our midst appeals to us, we must not repeat the sins and the errors of the past. We must resolve now to live as nobly and as justly as possible, as we educate new generations not to turn their back on our 'neighbors' and everything around us."-Pope Francis (Speech to U.S. Congress, June 24, 2015)

 

"We are a society which has forgotten how to weep, how to experience compassion - suffering with - others ... Let us ask the Lord for the grace to weep over our indifference, to weep over the cruelty of our world, of our own hearts, and of all those who in anonymity make social and economic decisions which open the door to tragic situations like this. Has anyone wept? Today, has anyone wept in our world?"

 

October 30th                                     Racial Justice

 

As we live out this Jubilee Year of Mercy and the United States enters into the 2016 election season, Americans face a myriad of choices between competing visions for our nation's future.

 

 "The problem of intolerance must be confronted in all its forms: wherever any minority is persecuted and marginalized because of its religious convictions or ethnic identity, the wellbeing of society as a whole is endangered and each one of us must feel affected."-Pope Francis (Address to delegation of the Simon Wiesenthal Center 10/24/13)

 

 

November 6th           Freedom of Religion and Conscience

 

As we live out this Jubilee Year of Mercy and the United States enters into the 2016 election season, Americans face a myriad of choices between competing visions for our nation's future.

 

"American Catholics are committed to building a society which is truly tolerant and inclusive, to safeguarding the rights of individuals and communities, and to rejecting every form of unjust discrimination. With countless other people of goodwill, they are likewise concerned that efforts to build a just and wisely ordered society respect their deepest concerns and the right to religious liberty. That freedom reminds one of America's most precious possessions."-Pope Francis (Speech at White House, September 23, 2015)

 

At times there can be honest disagreements about just what is the common good, but we must work together to ensure that the religious consciences of all of our people are honored. This, at times, can lead to different perspectives on the freedom of practice of religious beliefs; but our faith challenges us to work together to find the way forward where we maximize the freedom of expression and denigrate no one.

 

SPONSORS

 

Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good Columban Center for Advocacy and Outreach Conference of Major Superiors of Men

Faith in Public Life: Catholic Program

Franciscan Action Network

Leadership Conference of Women Religious

National Advocacy Center of the Sisters of the Good Shepherd

Pax Christi USA

Pax Christi International

Sisters of Mercy of the Americas' Extended Justice Team

 

HOLY FATHER: “DUE TO OUR COMMON ROOTS, A CHRISTIAN CANNOT BE ANTI-SEMITIC!”

Vatican City, 24 June 2013 (VIS) – At noon today, the Holy Father received 30 members of the delegation of the International Jewish Committee on Interreligious Consultations. The Pope recalled that 21 previous meetings have helped to strengthen the mutual understanding and ties of friendship between Jews and Catholics.

This is Pope Francis' first official meeting with a group of representatives of Jewish organizations and communities since his election. The pontiff said that the “Nostra Aetate” Declaration of the Second Vatican Council represents “a key point of reference for relations with the Jewish people” for the Catholic Church.

“In that Council text, the Church recognizes that 'the beginnings of its faith and election are to be found in the patriarchs, Moses, and prophets'. And, with regard to the Jews, the Council recalls the teaching of Saint Paul, who wrote 'the gifts and the call of God are irrevocable' and who also firmly condemned hatred, persecution, and all forms of anti-Semitism. Due to our common roots, a Christian cannot be anti-Semitic!”

The Holy Father noted that “the fundamental principles expressed by the Declaration have marked the path of greater awareness and mutual understanding trodden these last decades by Jews and Catholics, a path which my predecessors have strongly encouraged, both by very significant gestures and by the publication of a series of documents to deepen the thinking about the theological roots of the relations between Jews and Christians.”

Nevertheless, this represents “only the most visible element of a vast movement that takes place on the local level a bit throughout the world, as I know from personal experience. During my ministry as Archbishop of Buenos Aires, I had the joy of maintaining relations of sincere friendship with leaders of the Jewish world. We talked often of our respective religious identities, the image of the human person found in the Scriptures, and how to keep an awareness of God alive in a world now secularized in many ways. I met with them on various occasions to discuss the common challenges faced by both Jews and Christians. But above all, as friends, we enjoyed each other’s company, we were mutually enriched through encounter and dialogue, with an attitude of reciprocal welcome, and this helped all of us grow as persons and as believers.”

“These friendly relations are, in a way, the basis for the development of a more official dialogue,” the Pope said, encouraging those present to follow their path, “trying, as you do so, to involve younger generations. Humanity needs our joint witness in favour of respect for the dignity of man and woman created in the image and likeness of God and in favour of the peace that is, above all, God’s gift.”

Pope Francis concluded his address by recalling the words of the prophet Jeremiah: “For I know well the plans I have in mind for you—affirms the Lord—plans for your welfare and not for woe, so as to give you a future of hope.”

 

Please keep in your prayers this week all those who work for Nassau County and all those who depend on services provided by the county. As a result of the shameful partisan deadlock between the County Executive and Legislature, many Nassau contracts for youth, seniors, veterans and treatment programs for drugs, alcohol, and mental illness have been canceled. This has led to the closing of many programs for at-risk children and others.
Please keep the leaders and county workers in Suffolk in your prayers, too, as Suffolk struggles—far more intelligently--with its own budget deficit.
This is a good time at all to tell your elected officials what you think their funding priorities should be.
A flyer can be found below for a rally on Sept. 27 at Hicksville United Methodist Church to protest these closures.

Share the Harvest
“SHARE THE HARVEST” OCT. 4
Honorees: The Nassau County Bar Association
&
Arvind Vora, chair of the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum
Tickets: $135
Supporting the Long Island Council of Churches Emergency Food Program
& the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum
Have items to donate for the auction on Oct. 4?
Call Grace Simonette at 631-265-5823 or email her at gracesimonette@gmail.com

NEW CHILDREN’S LIBRARY AT FREEPORT PANTRY
Local Girl Scouts have helped us establish a take-a-book/leave-a-book children’s library at our Freeport pantry as part of the children’s play area in our reception area. Donations of children’s books are welcome.

WANT TO VISIT THE MORMONS?

The LICC’s Dialogue Committee is taking another road trip, this time to the Plainview Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (a.k.a. the Mormons), whom we hope to interest in the LI Multi-Faith Forum. Want to come? We will meet at the stake early on Saturday morning, Nov. 10, at 8:30 a.m. and have a chance to see how they distribute food to those in need in a way that seeks to preserve their dignity, then we’ll tour the Stake building, and sit down for a discussion with local LDS leaders. You are invited to come along and invited to ask questions about Mormon beliefs that puzzle or offend you. Why do they perform baptism by proxy for non-Mormons who have died, for example, and what does this mean to them? Let me know if you plan to come!

UPDATE ON CROP WALKS
We’ve learned about another CROP Walk next month, taking place in Montauk on Oct. 21 and a few more details about walks we have described previously. CROP Walks (Communities Responding to Overcome Poverty) raise money for both local anti-hunger ministries and Church World Service, the ecumenical disaster relief agency—which provides vital assistance to those affected by hurricanes such as Isaac. Are you taking part in a CROP Walk this fall? If so, we’d be glad to help pass the word about your walk. If you cannot walk yourself, perhaps you’d like to sponsor a walker. Yours truly is walking in Hicksville on Saturday, Oct. 20, and would be glad to have more sponsors! This is what we know thus far about fall CROP Walks:
East Meadow CROP Walk Oct. 13
Eisenhower Park, Saturday, Oct. 13. Registration begins at 10:00 and the Walk begins at 11 a.m., with options for either a 1-mile or 3-mile walk.
Contact Arlene Kallaur at arlenekallaur@hotmail.com or 516-942-7841 .
Western Nassau CROP Walk Oct. 14
Baldwin Park, Sunday, Oct. 14,
5-mile walk begins at 1:00
Contact the Rev. Mark Lukens at revlu@optonline.net or 516-599-5768 .
Sag Harbor CROP Walk Oct. 14
Sunday, Oct. 16, registration begins at 12:15,
4 mile begins at Old Whaler’s Church, 44 Union Street, at 1:00
Contact: Rev. Mark Philips, at vicarmark@aol.com or 631-725-3748 or 631-725-0894
Hicksville CROP Walk Oct. 20
October 20, rain or shine, at Cantiague County Park, W. John Street
Times: 9:30 am registration
10:00 am Walk begins after brief words by Tom Goodhue
Coordinators: Hank Lay (516-938-1233) and Rose Mattei (RLMattei@yahoo.com )
Southold (North Fork) Oct. 21
Registration begins at 1st Presbyterian, 53100 Main Road, at noon; Sunday, Oct 16
6-mile Walk begins at 1:00
Contact Herb Adler, 631-765-3365 or Audrey Reinhardt at 631-765-3748
Westhampton CROP Walk Oct. 21
Sunday, Oct. 21, registration begins at 11:15
Beginning at Westhampton Presbyterian Church, a 6-mile walk
Contact: Stuart Wood
Riverhead CROP Walk Oct. 21
Sunday, 2 P.M. Sponsored by the Riverhead Clergy Council, the route of 4.6 miles leaves from and returns to Riverhead's United Methodist Church.
Contact: Liz Wines
Montauk CROP Walk Oct. 21
Sunday, Oct. 21,
Contact: Rev. William Hoffman at 631-668-2022 or BillHoff.mcc@gmail.com
Brookhaven CROP Walk Oct. 28
Sunday, Oct. 28, in Port Jefferson. Registration and will take place in Memorial Park (across from the Port Jefferson Village Hall) from beginning at 1:00. The walk will start at 2:00. Contact: Randi Leonard, leonard.randi@gmail.com or (631) 928-5861 .
Sayville CROP Walk Oct. 28
Sunday, Oct. 28. Registration at 12:30 P.M. at the Sayville Common Ground, between Gillette & Candee Avenues. The walk begins at 1:00 P.M. Contact: Jerry Avolio, Jerry.Avolio@Firstdata.com

SANCTUARY FURNISHING OFFERED
*Christ Church in Port Jefferson Station has a small wooden altar to donate. Contact Pastor Randy Paige at randy.paige@yahoo.com
*Riverhead United Methodist Church has some altar items to donate:
2 large brass Candlesticks, with square bases, about 15” tall,
5 brass offering plates, and
2 flower vases.
If you are interested in any or all of these, please call Jeanine in the RUMC office (631-727-2327).
*The Rev. Alfred Miller has a pulpit in good condition at his home in Hempstead that he would be glad to give away. It will fit into a pickup truck or SUV. You can reach him at 516-385-1579 or 516-205-2075 .

HAVE A FRIG OR FREEZER TO DONATE?
KNOW ANYONE WHO NEEDS A BED, WASHER OR DRYER?
Laura Massano at Catholic Charities is seeking a freezer or frig/freezer for a client. If you have one to donate, please call her at 631-608-8883 .
And the Rev. Ann Morgan, pastor of Merrick United Methodist Church, is looking for a small (cube) refrigerator for someone. You can reach her at reverendmorgan@merrickumc.com
A member of Douglaston Reformed Church has a trundle bed to give away (a twin bed the converts into a double bed). They are able to transport it. Call Yolanda Murray in our Hempstead office at 516-565-0290 if you are interested.
Gus Segredo has a washing machine in good condition to give away, for the taking from his home in Freeport. If you are interested, please contact him at gussegredo@gmail.com
The Rev. David McClean has a washer and dryer to give away. Both are white Maytags in good shape and can be picked up in Dix Hills nearly any weekend. If you are interested, you can email him at dmcclean@hotmail.com

Previously Posted:

SAD NEWS ON RENT, MORTGAGE, AND UTILITY ASSISTANCE
No agency in Nassau or Suffolk has received Emergency Food and Shelter Program funds for rent, mortgage, or utility assistance yet this year—and we have now heard that neither county qualifies for the next round of federal grants. It will be sometime before we know what if any funds may reach Long Island from the state set-aside funds. The federal formula for determining which communities need assistance makes no sense to me.

AND WE NEED FOOD
This also means that we have not yet received an EFSP funds for our food pantries, and we do not know if and when any such funds will be available to purchase food. Thanks to a generous grant from the Walmart Foundation, we have kept the shelves more or less stocked this summer, but we now have nearly exhausted this grant. If you have been collecting food for our emergency food centers, this would be a great time to donate it!
Cereal seems to be in short supply right now in Freeport. This is also a great time to share produce from your garden. Or do a food drive.

Food donations can be dropped off at the Long Island Council of Churches’ Emergency Food Pantries in Freeport (450 N. Main Street, 516-868-4989 ), Hempstead (in Christ’s 1st Presbyterian Church, 516-565-0290 ), and Riverhead (407 Osborne Avenue at Lincoln, 631-727-2210 )--or at any LICC meeting or event. Donations of toiletries, personal care items, school supplies, small household goods, and shopping bags also are welcome at all of our locations. The best times to drop off donations are Monday-Friday, 9:00 to 4:30 in Riverhead and 10 to 4 in Freeport—please call if you plan to come earlier or later.

ALSO NEEDED IN OUR PANTRIES
Donations of fall and winter clothing are needed in the Long Island Council of Churches’ Emergency Food Pantries in Freeport (450 N. Main Street, 516-868-4989 ), Hempstead (in Christ’s 1st Presbyterian Church, 516-565-0290 ), and Riverhead (407 Osborne Avenue at Lincoln, 631-727-2210 ). Donations of toiletries, personal care items, school supplies, small household goods, and shopping bags also are welcome at all of our locations. The best times to drop off donations are Monday-Friday, 9:00 to 4:30 in Riverhead & Hempstead or 10 to 4 in Freeport—please call if you plan to come earlier or later.
Our Hempstead office needs carpeting or area rugs, too.
Thanks!

Corrections for Web sites in the Sept. Prelude
Our Web site coordinator Carolyn Moon noticed a typo in a Web site I mentioned in the article about new help with HARP 2 for “underwater” homeowners, which you can read at our Web site, www.liccny.org
To qualify for HARP 2 refinancing, one must have a mortgage issued before June 2009 that is owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. If you are not sure who owns your loan, visit www.fanniemae.com/loanlookup and www.freddiemac.com/mymortgage.

And Carolyn found that the IRS has updated its page of information on how nonprofits can avoid trouble in an election year. You should now visit
http://www.irs.gov/uac/Charities,-Churches-and-Politics or http://www.irs.gov/Charities-&-Non-Profits/Charitable-Organizations/Charities,-Churches,-and-Educational-Organizations---Political-Campaign-Intervention

HELP US UPDATE OUR MAILING LISTS
Are we sending you duplicate copies of our newsletter? Would you prefer we use another address? Please let us know and we will make amends. Also, if you would prefer the emailed newsletter rather than the printed Prelude (which are similar but not identical in content) or if you would like to be on the email lists for our specialized postings, which are sent every week or two, just let us know which e-blasts you want and which email address you’d like us to use. These specialized lists cover:
--affordable housing options on Long Island
--free and cheap health care resources
--information for seniors
--all other sorts of assistance to those in need

ADS & ANNOUNCEMENTS:



Sept 27 rally_0001ORGANIST/CHOIR DIRECTOR SOUGHT
The Church in the Garden in Garden City is seeking a part-time organist/pianist/choir director, beginning Oct. 1. The organ is a 2-manual Allen electronic organ.
The church is a small, multi-cultural, American Baptist Church with a 10 AM Sunday Service and a weekly rehearsal with a small choir (3-4 people) that sings one anthem each Sunday (unison/2part). There are two additional services on Christmas Eve and Maundy Thursday. There are also a few weddings each year, for which there is additional pay, following the AGO guidelines.
Salary - $8500 a year, with 4 weeks of vacation. The position is for less than 4 hours of work at the church and preparation.
Send resumes to: Barbara Wieder, Music Committee Chair, at wieder@mricg.com
For further information, please call her at 516-223-3122

GREAT SKILLS TO SHARE
Foreign Language Professor, Linguist and Polyglot
will give FREE German and French lessons
in exchange for FREE Golf and Tennis lessons.
She accepts ALL levels, ages and cultures.
Long Island & Forest Hills areas.
Serious inquiries only.
Contact:
Great Skills To Share
P. O. Box 1195
Valley Stream, NY 11582
E-mail: greatskillstoshare@gmail.com

YOUTH DIRECTOR SOUGHT IN HUNTINGTON
Youth Director sought by Old First Presbyterian Church in Huntington.
Enthusiastic, energetic leader of Christian faith; top organizer/interactor/communicator; background in Christian education or teaching/coaching experience helpful. Part-time: 25-30 flexible hrs/wk; salary: $30-35,000/yr. Inquiries/resumes to Pete Fetterolf: pfettero@optonline.net

SPACE AVAILABLE TO SHARE IN NEW HYDE PARK
Hillside United Methodist Church in New Hyde Park has space they would be glad to share with another congregation, school, or not-for-profit agency. Their sanctuary seats 300 and is available Sunday afternoons between 1 and 4 p.m. They also have three classrooms, a children’s room, a small chapel, and a meeting room/library that they might be able to share Monday through Friday.
For further information, contact Bob Graf at 516-741-5148 .

CHURCH SPACE TO SHARE IN MASSAPEQUA:
The Presbyterian Community Church in Massapequa has space to share with another congregation:
Sanctuary, two levels, seats 225, generally available except Sunday before noon
Fellowship hall/auditorium/gymnasium with kitchen
Club room
Parking lot and street parking for 60 cars (on weekends, additional parking is available)
Several classrooms
This is a large building that can be used for worship, meetings and other gatherings.
We are conveniently located near the Southern State Parkway, Route 135 and Sunrise Highway. Please call Pete LaMassa at 516-316-6571 for more information.

SPACE OFFERED IN RIVERHEAD AREA
First Parish Church in Northville (Sound Ave & Church Lane) has both sanctuary space and room at “the Grange” to share with another congregation or organization.
The sanctuary seats up to 300 people and space is available there or at the Grange Saturdays, Sunday morning or evening, and other times during the week. For more information, call the Rev. Diane Rodriguez at 631-608-3827 .

Space Available To Share in Bay Shore
Bay Shore United Methodist Church would be glad to share its beautiful, historic sanctuary with another congregation Sunday afternoon or evening. There is ample parking, storage, and classroom space to share also.Contact Pastor Sungmu Lee at 631-456-1713 .

 




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LI Council of Churches
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September 2012 Long Island Council of Churches newsletter, The Prelude
These items do not appear in the printed, snail-mailed version of The Prelude:

Fall CROP Walks To Help the Hungry
School Supplies Needed
Free Foreclosure Clinic Sept. 10 in Mineola
Pastoral Care Specialist Training Offered in Bethpage
New Pet Food Pantry in East Meadow
SEPTEMBER BLOOD DRIVES—SAVE A LIFE!
Youth Director Sought in Huntington
SPACE TO SHARE IN NEW HYDE PARK

FROM OUR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: A School for Our Souls
Recently the LICC’s Dialogue Committee visited Global Harmony House, the Brahma Kumaris headquarters for North & South America in Great Neck. The BKs, whose name means “daughters of the Creator,” are a fascinating faith community that has much to teach others.

Erik Larson, a frequent volunteer and founding member of the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum, explained that the Brahma Kumaris began in Sindh (now part of Pakistan), with roots in Hinduism, and have now spread around the globe. They see themselves as a program of ongoing education for the soul and as new religious movement only within cyclical time, in which something is new, then old, then new again. They have no formal membership, no dues, no prescribed ritual. As its name implies they have far more women among their leaders than in Hinduism. They also are monotheist, seeing God as a Supreme Being who can be thought of in either paternal or maternal terms.

One does not need to break with one’s faith community to hang out with the BKs. Growing up Christian in the Midwest, Erik said, he felt God was unknowable. He learned from the BKs, who emphasize both meditation and service, how to find intimacy with God. Herein lies the first lesson: contemplative prayer is an ancient and still-vital part of Christian, Jewish, and Muslim traditions but many who are raised in the church, synagogue, or mosque never hear about it. And we would be wise to create many doors into our houses of worship and opportunities to learn before joining.

We were fortunate enough to visit Global Harmony House when Sister Mohini, the head of the Brahma Kumaris for the Western Hemisphere and someone who worked with the founders of the movement since the 1940s, was in Great Neck. She told us how important religious dialogue is in their community, hosting many dialogues with politicians, journalists, and other professional groups. The BKs particularly focus on inviting young leaders to their dialogues.

BKs take their commitment to spiritual disciple seriously. Global Harmony House offers guided meditation every morning from 4:00 to 4:45 and then a class from 6:00 until 7:00. Deeply committed to nonviolence, they believe, Sr. Mohini said, “If I am for peace, I need to be in peace.” Indeed, they call their retreat center in the Catskills “Peace Village.” One of their most popular courses right now in America, she noted, is anger management!

The Brahma Kumaris approach an issue of injustice or the environmental crises, Sister Mohini said, by seeking to change attitudes and perspectives that cause injustice, moving from the spiritual to social issues. Like Bahais and Muslims, they tend to focus on goals rather than problems, “the light rather than the darkness,” having learned from Gandhi to “be the change you want to see in the world.”

And this may be another lesson for other faith communities. Many of us believe that spirituality and social action go hand in hand, but we would do well to embody this in our religious practice. Martin Luther once remarked that he had to spend much time in prayer in order to accomplish all that he did the rest of the day. And as New Testament scholar Walter Wink taught many of us, we can only engage structures of domination and oppression if we have first centered ourselves spiritually.

Om Shanti/Shalom/Salaam/Pax/Jai Jinendra,

Tom

LICC VISIT TO GLOBAL HARMONY HOUSE
June13.2012.DialogueCommitteeVisittoBrahmaKumarisinGreatNeck
Front Row:
1. Rev. Charles Cary, Westhampton Presbyterian Church
2. Arvind Vora, Chairman, Long Island Multi Faith Forum
3. Anil Vora, Invited Jain Guest
4. Sister Mohini, Head of Brahma Kumaris, North and South America
5. Rev. Lorraine De Armitt, Westbury United Methodist Church
6. Rev. Moira Ahearne
7. Rev. Forrest Parkinson, Community Church of East Williston
Back Row:
1. Rev. Harold Lay, Parkway Community Church, Hicksville
2. Rev. Tom Goodhue, Executive Director, LICC
3. Rev. Richard Visconti, The Caroline Church(Episcopal), Setauket
4. Grace Simonette, First Presbyterian Church, Smithtown
5. Brother Erik Larson, Brahma Kumari, Global Harmony House

INTERFAITH PRAYER SERVICE
ON THE EVE OF THE INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE
SEPT. 20, 7 P.M. GLOBAL HARMONY HOUSE IN GREAT NECK
The Long Island Council of Churches and the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum invite you to a prayer service on Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. at Global Harmony House, Brahma Kumaris’ headquarters for North and South Americas of Brahma Kumris. Refreshments, with vegetarian food that should accommodate a wide variety of dietary restrictions, will follow at 8:15. There is no charge for this gathering, but donations to GHH are welcome.
Global Harmony House is located at 46 South Middle Neck Road in Great Neck.
LIE Exit 33 for Community Drive/ Lakeville Road
For Westbound Traffic, after the exit turn right at the second traffic
light on Lakeville Road
For Eastbound Traffic, after the exit turn left at the first traffic light
on Lakeville Road
Drive less than a mile & Cross Northern Blvd (Rt. 25 A)
Now Lakeville Road becomes Middle Neck Road
Drive less than a mile & at the second traffic light turn left on Pont
Street and park your car on street. Corner Building is GHH.
RSVP: Rev. Tom Goodhue at tomgoodhue@optonline.net or
Arvind Vora at avora@optonline.net or Erik Larson at erik.larson@pointmail.org

DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
Sara C. Weiss, Director of Development
Special thanks go to Newsday Charities for its $48,000 grant for our Emergency Food and Social Services programs, to the Nassau County Bar Association & its WE CARE Advisory Board for its $20,000 grant for our Nassau County Emergency Food and Social Services programs, and to the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island for its $3,000 sponsorship for this year’s Share the Harvest: Helping Neighbors in Need special event on Oct. 4. We also thank a couple who, alas, moved out of our area, for their $1,500 sponsorship for Share the Harvest: Helping Neighbors in Need.

We also thank the following institutions for their gifts:
Arrow Exterminating $800 Freeport Food Pantry
Church World Service $1,459 Use Where Most Needed
Garden City Community Church $3,750 Use Where Most Needed
Grace United Methodist Church $738 Use Where Most Needed
Presbytery of Long Island $1,412 Use Where Most Needed
Ridgewood Savings Bank $1,500 Financial Education
Suffolk Association United Church of Christ $1,600 Use Where Most Needed
United Church of Rockville Centre $500 Use Where Most Needed
Zurich American Insurance Co. $500 Employee Matching Gift
And as always, we thank all our donors who gave less than $500. It’s all of you that enable us to carry out our ministry to serve Long Island’s most vulnerable citizens.

Most Urgent Need
Recently five families in an apartment building near our Hempstead office were driven from their homes when a fire broke out and destroyed the apartments in which they lived. These families range in size from three to six per family and include young children ranging from newborns to teenagers. The families are on Section 8 and for most, Social Security/Disability is their only source income, though some of the adults do have jobs.

In order to find new housing, the families have to travel back and forth to the Department of Social Services, the Social Security office, search for new housing, etc. Our federal Emergency Food and Shelter Program funds have not yet arrived, so we have no funds to help them with housing assistance, but it would help them enormously if we could provide MetroCards for them to get to all of these appointments and search for new housing. We also need MetroCards to help many other families who need assistance to get to doctors’ appointments, new jobs, and such. Can you help us provide much-needed transportation assistance?

Memorial/Tribute Gifts
A great way to remember a loved one, whether living or deceased, is to give a memorial or tribute gift in his/her name. In your letter accompanying such a gift, please tell us who the gift is in memory or tribute to, and who is giving the gift. We will send a thank you letter to the contributor and to the family of the loved one in accordance with your instructions. Please send your contribution to the LICC, attention Sara Weiss. If you have any questions, call Sara for further information at 516-565-0290 , ext. 207. Naming and Tribute opportunities are also available for our programs. Please call Sara for a list. We also have planned giving opportunities that will sustain these programs in perpetuity.

Share the Harvest
“SHARE THE HARVEST” OCT. 4
Honorees: The Nassau County Bar Association
&
Arvind Vora, chair of the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum
Tickets: Suggested donation, $135
Supporting the Long Island Council of Churches Emergency Food Program
& the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum
Have items to donate for the auction on Oct. 4?
Call Grace Simonette at 631-265-5823 or email her at gracesimonette@gmail.com


How To Stay Out of Trouble in an Election Year
Nearly every religion teaches compassion for the poor, but how can we tell the difference between advocacy on behalf of neighbors in need, which is always right, and partisan politics, which not-for-profits must avoid? Political campaigns frequently ask congregations and clergy to support them in ways that are illegal, unwise, or a violation of rules governing nonprofit organizations. How can your congregation stay out of trouble in an election year, when candidates and their supporters want you to aid their campaigns?

Houses of worship (and clergy acting in their official capacity) cannot legally support or oppose any particular party or candidate for office. They may support social justice, but should not:
--endorse candidates from the pulpit or in congregational newsletters, either explicitly or implicitly, not even their own members who are running for office;
--distribute campaign information that favors one party or candidate, even a member of the congregation;
--castigate one party for opposing some of your tradition’s teaching while giving members of the other party a free pass for their inconsistencies;
--post signs on their property that favor or oppose any party or candidate;
--organize voter registration or get-out-the-vote efforts for the purpose of electing any given party or candidate;
--raise money for a candidate or party;
--provide membership lists to candidates, even if the candidate is a member of the congregation.
--invite a candidate to speak during an election season without providing a comparable opportunity to his or her opponents;
--rent your building to a campaign.

Doing any of these things puts your tax exemption at risk. Even if it does not get you into hot water with the IRS, it may alienate people who respect the law. Even some things that may be legal--inviting elected officials to preach during their campaign or giving a candidate an award shortly before an election--are still bad ideas.

Houses of worship can and should:
--pray for candidates to campaign honestly and voters to judge them wisely,
--take positions that reflect their values on public policy, including legislation, through public education, petitions, letter-writing, and meetings with elected officials;
--organize non-partisan voter registration and get-out-the-vote drives;
--encourage members to volunteer as poll watchers on Election Day;
--host candidate forums, at least if all candidates are invited and the format favors no candidate or party. If you cannot invite those who disagree with your faith community’s position on an issue, don’t hold a forum.

Further information on how to do the right thing and stay on the right side of the law is available from the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism (http://rac.org) and the Internal Revenue Service (www.irs.gov/charities/charitable/article/0,,id=179773,00.html).

IDEAS YOU CAN USE: How To Welcome Visitors
The Rev. Nancy Arnold, the interim minister at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Huntington, recently shared with her congregation some ways to make visitors feel welcome:

  1. Wear your nametag—at least if nametags do not offend the sensibilities of your flock.
  2. Introduce yourself to people you do not know
  3. Volunteer to be a greeter for worship services
  4. Volunteer to staff the membership table before and after worship—and having such a table is a great idea in itself.
  5. After worship, speak to people you do not know before engaging in conversation those you know.
  6. When you meet a visitor, introduce him or her to another member.

NEW HELP FOR “UNDERWATER” HOMEOWNERS
In the wake of the mortgage meltdown, some borrowers who have never missed a loan payment find themselves owing more their house is now worth. They often could improve their chances of foreclosure if they could refinance, now that interest rates are at historic lows, but the declining value of their home usually has kept them from doing this. The U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development has greatly expanded eligibility for its Home Affordable Refinance Program to assist those who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth. It now has fewer fees and no longer requires second appraisal. And there is no longer any limit of the loan-to-value ratio in refinancing mortgages. To qualify for HARP 2 refinancing:
--You must have a mortgage issued before June 2009,that are owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. If you are not sure, visit www.fanniemaie.com/loanookup and www.freddiemac.com/mymortgage.
--You must be current on your mortgage payments for the past 6 months and not have paid late more than once in the past 12 months.
--Your current loan must be for more than 80% of your home’s value and you must not have previously refinanced under HARP.
We tell people in all of the LICC’s personal finance seminars that you should always get free HUD-certified mortgage counseling from a legitimate not-for-profit, such as these:
The Long Island Housing Partnership in Hauppauge, 631-435-4710
Debt Counseling Corp. in Hauppauge, 888-354-6332
American Debt Resources in East Northport, www.americandebtresources.com or 800-498-0766 .
GreenPath in Jericho and Hauppauge, 877-428-1113 or www.greenpath.org
The Community Development Corporation of Long Island in Centereach and Freeport, www.cdcli.org

And remember that the LICC offers free seminars on how to avoid foreclosure and other aspects of managing money well. Each presentation is shaped around the needs of the audience and we are prepared to address a wide variety of topics. The LICC will provide speakers and educational materials—all you need to provide is coffee and noshes. Thanks to generous funding for this effort this year from Astoria Federal Savings, Bank of America, Ridgewood Savings Bank, TD Charitable Foundation, and Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, there is no charge for this program. For more information, please visit www.ncccusa.org/ecmin/licc/managemoney.html. To request a program, please e-mail tomgoodhue@optonline.net or call 516-565-0290 , ext. 206.

WORTH QUOTING
Partisan Politics in Congregations Drives Away Young Adults
“Religious involvement in partisan politics is driving Americans, especially those under 35, away from organized religion. . . . Some rising evangelical leaders see this young adult drift, documented in this year’s Millennial Values Survey, as a factor that makes nonpartisanship a practical necessity for churches seeking to grow and thrive.”
--G. Jeffrey MacDonald, United Methodist Reporter June 8, 2012

Why Christians Fear Mormons
“In the 19th century, antagonists charged that Mormon men were tyrannical patriarchs, that Mormon women were virtual slaves and that Mormons diabolically blurred church and state. These accusations all contained some truth, though the self same accusers denied women the votes, bolstered racist patriarchy and enthroned mainstream Protestantism as something of a state religion.”
--J. Spencer Fluhman, assistant professor of history at Brigham Young University,
New York Times June 4, 2012

FALL CROP WALKS TO HELP THE HUNGRY
CROP Walks raise money for both local anti-hunger ministries and also for Church World Service, the ecumenical disaster relief agency—which provides vital assistance to those affected by hurricanes such as the one that just ripped through the Caribbean and Louisiana.
East Meadow CROP Walk Oct. 13
Eisenhower Park, Saturday, Oct. 13. Registration begins at 10:00 and the Walk begins at 11 a.m., with options for either a 1-mile or 3-mile walk.
Contact Arlene Kallaur at arlenekallaur@hotmail.com or 516-942-7841 .
Western Nassau CROP Walk Oct. 14
Baldwin Park, Sunday, Oct. 14,
5-mile walk begins at 1:00
Contact the Rev. Mark Lukens at revlu@optonline.net or 516-599-5768 .
Sag Harbor CROP Walk Oct. 14
Sunday, Oct. 16, registration begins at 12:15,
4 mile begins at Old Whaler’s Church, 44 Union Street, at 1:00
Contact: the Rev. Mark Philips, at vicarmark@aol.com , 631-725-3748 , or 631-725-0894
Hicksville CROP Walk Oct. 20
October 20, rain or shine, at Cantiague County Park, W. John Street
Times: 8:30 am begin setup, including Walk signs
9:30 am registration
10:00 am Walk begins after words by a speaker
11:30 am clean up and depart
Coordinators: Hank Lay (516-938-1233) and Rose Mattei (RLMattei@yahoo.com )
Southold (North Fork) Oct. 21
Registration begins at 1st Presbyterian, 53100 Main Road, at noon; Sunday, Oct 16
6-mile Walk begins at 1:00
Contact Herb Adler, 631-765-3365 or Audrey at 631-765-3748
Westhampton CROP Walk Oct. 21
Sunday, Oct. 21, registration begins at 11:15
Beginning at Westhampton Presbyterian Church, a 6-mile walk
Contact: Stuart Wood

NEEDED/OFFERED
Needed:
*School Supplies Needed
Do you have supplies in your home or office that kids might need in September?
The LICC is seeking donations of
4 x 6 inch file cards
Notebooks
Loose-leaf paper
Composition books
Binders and pocket folders
Pens, pencils, erasers and sharpeners
Highlighters, markers, and colored pencils
Glue
Book bags and backpacks
Anything else a student might use
Donations are welcome at our locations in Hempstead (in Christ’s 1st Presbyterian Church, 516-565-0290 ), Freeport (450 N. Main Street, 516-868-4989 ), and Riverhead (407 Osborne Avenue at Lincoln, 631-727-2210 )--or at any LICC meeting or event.

Offered:
*Multi-Faith Education
The Long Island Council of Churches and Auburn Theological Seminary launched the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum in 1993 to help people in our area understand their neighbors. The LIMFF unites hundreds of Islanders from eleven different faith communities and many races, nationalities, and cultures. Our volunteers represent the Bahai Faith, the Brahma Kumaris, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduisms, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Native American Spirituality, Sikhism, and Unitarian Universalism. If you are not familiar with all these traditions or did not know that they are your neighbors, you may need a Building Bridges program! The Forum has presented more than 270 programs in schools, workplaces, and houses of worship, for audiences ranging from ten to 1100. While most of our programs are done in English, we have also been able to accommodate requests for Spanish language and bi-lingual presentations and could try other languages as well. The Forum has also developed a fun game-show format called “What’s My Faith.” For more information, please visit www.liccny.org. To request a presentation, contact Bernice Suplee at jbsuplee@aol.com or (631) 665-7033 .
Michael Fairchild, who produced the half-hour “Faiths of Long Island” video for the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum has loaded it onto YouTube. You can see the video at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ncnn5pd6Gu4
and
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOsL0LaClgU
*Free Foreclosure Clinic Sept. 10 in Mineola
The Nassau County Bar Association is offering a free Mortgage Foreclosure Consultation Clinic for Nassau residents on Monday, Sept. 10, from 3 to 6 p.m. at the Bar Assn., 15th & West Streets in Mineola, a block south of Old Country Road. Individual consultations are available with representatives from the Nassau County Homeownership Center, Community Development Corporation of Long Island, La Fuerza Unida, Nassan/Suffolk Law Services, and volunteer bankruptcy attorneys from the Bar Assn. There is no charge for these consultations, but you must make a reservation in advance by calling 516-747-4070 . Consultations are available in Spanish, Hatian Creole, Russian, Polish, Greek, Mandarin, Korean, Hindi, Urdu, Farsi and several other languages upon request.
*New Pet Food Pantry in East Meadow
When you are struggling to make ends meet, it is hard to afford the care and feeding of pets—who provide the love and companionship you need in hard times. The LICC gladly accepts donations of pet food that your critter no longer needs or refuses to eat, but our pantries may be too far to travel for dog kibble or cat food. East Meadow United Methodist Church has launched a new pet food pantry at 470 East Meadow Avenue that is open Tuesday through Friday from 9 to 1. For further info or to arrange to donate or pick up pet food, please call 516-794-5855 .
*Help Getting Health Care & Food Stamps
The Health & Welfare Council of Long Island has been in operation for 65 years “to respond to the needs of Long Islanders, ensuring that the voices of the powerless are heard.” They currently have a new program serving both Nassau and Suffolk so provide residents easier access to benefits and vital services they need to thrive. The program provides a more comprehensive level of services to access health care and food stamp benefits. The HWCLI Facilitated Enrollers can provide assistance with both programs in both counties, as well as refer to other services the individual may need. Many people never have to take off a day from work to go to the DSS and can sometimes handle everything they need in just one appointment, or at least within one agency, and in one place. HWCLI Enrollers are available to travel throughout both counties. There have been many changes to existing programs, and 1 in 9 Long Islanders may now be eligible. For more information, contact Jennifer Capezza, L. I. Anti-Hunger Outreach Coordinator, at jcapezza@hwcli.com or 516-505-4430 .
*Pastoral Care Specialist Training Offered
Classes will meet at Arumdaun Presbyterian Church in Bethpage, beginning Sept. 10. Application deadline is Sept. 6. This two year program This is a two-year training program led by Penny Gadzini, Miriam Koo, and Joshua Jong, all three being ordained ministers who are also Blanton-Peale trained pastoral counselors. Classes are on Mondays and are designed to prepare church people to minister to the sick, the grieving, and others in need of visitation in your community. For more information or to apply contact the Rev. Dr. Penny Gadzini at (917)287-0583 , pennygadzini@aol.com , or 21 James St., Babylon NY 11702.
*Free Training in Spiritual Care
Are you looking for an avenue to volunteer your time with others?
Come learn more about sharing your gift of time and presence as a Spiritual Care Companion with those that are hospitalized or living in a nursing home, homebound or developmentally disabled.
Spiritual Care Companions will attend a free six-week training offered by Catholic Health Services of Long Island.
Topics include: Goals of ministry to the sick; how to be a good listener and serve as a spiritual companion; how to respond to crisis and grief.
St. Catherine of Sienna Medical Center – Smithtown
Information session: September 13 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.
6-week training Thursdays, 6:45 – 9:30 p.m., Oct. 4-Nov. 8.
Please for more information, please email Trish.Luvin@CHSLI.org or Caroline.Cella@CHSLI.org or call 631-465-6306 or 631-465-6307 .
*Bedroom Set, Washer, and Dryer
A member of Douglaston Reformed Church has a trundle bed to give away (a twin bed the converts into a double bed). They are able to transport it. Call Yolanda Murray in our Hempstead office at 516-565-0290 if you are interested.
Gus Segredo has a washing machine in good condition to give away, for the taking from his home in Freeport. If you are interested, please contact him at gussegredo@gmail.com
The Rev. David McClean has a washer and dryer to give away. Both are white Maytags in good shape and can be picked up in Dix Hills nearly any weekend. If you are interested, you can email him at dmcclean@hotmail.com

LOOKING FOR A GUEST PREACHER OR SPEAKER IN OCTOBER?
October is Pastoral Care Month, a great time to invite a chaplain campus minister, or pastoral counselor to preach. Here are some we know:
*LICC Head Chaplain Nancy Schaffer, ordained in the United Church of Christ, 631-586-9667 .
*LICC Chaplain Lawrence W. Swensen, 516-794-4505 .
*The Rev. Marianne K Tomecek, Executive Director of Long Island Campus Ministry, who is ordained in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and can preach and celebrate communion in English or Spanish, mktomecek@aol.com or 516-425-7094 .
*The Rev. Dr. Penny Gadzini, a pastoral counselor ordained in the United Methodist Church, 917-287-0583 .
*Sister Camille D'Arienzo, RSM, has done extensive prison ministry with death-row inmates, cherilife@aol.com or 718-366-0966 .
*The Rev. Kitt Von Braunsberg, ordained in the United Church of Christ, is a chaplain at Nassau University Medical Center, 516-801-4275 .
*Rabbi Barry Dov Schwartz, a campus minister at Adelphi University, bds48@aol.com .
*Caren Heacock, Pastoral Care Assistant at Mattituck Presbyterian Church, 631-298-4145 .
*Alex Thomas, campus staff worker for Intervarsity Christian Fellowship at Nassau Community College, 516-606-8267 .
*Jainnie Hackman, campus staff worker for Intervarsity Christian Fellowship at Hofstra University, jainniehackman@Gmail.com or hofstraivcf@gmail.com or 516-509-2397 .

For a listing of other pinch-hitters and information about the “going rate” for guest preachers and substitute organists, visit www.ncccusa.org/ecmin/licc/guestpreachers.html

SEPTEMBER BLOOD DRIVES—SAVE A LIFE!

9/2/12 Hyo Shin Bible Church, 42-15 166th Street, Flushing 8:30 AM-2:30 PM
9/2/12 First Presbyterian Church, 89-60 164th Street, Jamaica 9:00 AM-3:00 PM
9/8/12 Our Savior Lutheran Church, 90-04 175th Street, Jamaica Noon-4:30 PM
9/12/12 Calvary Lutheran Church, 860 Town Line Road, Hauppauge 2:00-8:00 PM
9/18/12 Christ Lutheran Church, 3384 Island Road, Wantagh 2:15-8:15 PM
9/18/12 St. James RC Church, Hicksville Rd & Seamans Neck Rd., Seaford 3:30-8:00
in their Parish Center, a block south of Hempstead Tpke. For an appointment or further information, please call Eleanor at 516- 694-2016 .
9/22/12 Bethany Presbyterian, 425 Maplewood Rd., Huntington Station 10:30-4:30
9/25/12 Church on the Sound, 335 Oxhead Rd., Stony Brook 2:45-8:45 PM
9/25/12 First Presbyterian Church, 60 E. Main Street, Oyster Bay 2:45-8:45 PM
9/26/12 Grace Methodist Church, 21 S. Franklin Ave., Valley Stream 2:30-8:30 PM
9/26/12 St. Mark Episcopal Church, 754 Main St., Islip 2:45-8:45 PM
You can call 1-800-933-2566 or visit www.nybloodcenter.org to verify the date and time of the blood drive.

ADS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADVERTISING IN THE PRELUDE
Each month we mail about 2700 copies of our newsletter The Prelude to the clergy leaders and lay leaders of 1450 faith organizations. We also email this newsletter to 2300 religious leaders and post it on our Web site (www.liccny.org). Filled with timely articles, news briefs, updates and notices affecting Long Island’s communities and churches and the wider world, The Prelude is a must read for all who would “work together to improve Long Island and promote interfaith understanding and cooperation.” The LICC accepts paid sponsorship ads, display ads and simple listings (classifieds). Advertising in The Prelude is a great way to reach clergy, lay leaders, and volunteers in Long Island’s congregations. To receive a “media kit” with advertising rates, copy requirements, and copy deadlines, please call 516-565-0290 or email tomgoodhue@optonline.net . Congregations that join the LICC and groups that join the Friends of the LICC receive a free classified ad in thanks for paying their annual dues.

HOW TO DEVELOP TIPPERS INTO TITHERS
Join Paul Nickerson for Just in time training for these difficult economic times”
Saturday, September 8
9:00am to 1:00pm
PRC Long Island West
919 Elmont Road, Valley Stream, NY 11580
Sunday, September 9
1:00pm to 5:00pm
First UMC of Central Islip
51 Wheeler Road, Central Islip, NY 11722
Get your Stewardship and Financial committees off to a good start. This workshop has been designed for a church team: bring the pastor and members of finance and stewardship committees or others interested in the topic to learn:
Principles of giving
Re-thinking motives for giving
Re-thinking the stewardship letter
Helping people grow in their giving
Fee $35 per person or $105 for group of 4
Members of the following denominational organizations will receive discounted prices due to their financial support of this workshop: Long Island East District of UMC, Metro Association of UCC, Suffolk Association of UCC, and Episcopal Diocese of Long Island
Fee $25 per person or $75 for group of 4
To register call Parish Resource Center at 631-821-2255 ,
email us at info@prcli.org ,
visit our website at www.parishresourcecenter.com/lieast/workshops
A flyer is available at http://www.parishresourcecenter.com/lieast/documents/TipperstoTithers_000.pdf
About our workshop leader
Rev. Paul B. Nickerson is an ordained United Church of Christ Minister of 32 years. Paul is a graduate of Boston University and Andover-Newton Theological School. For twenty years, Paul served local parishes in Connecticut and Massachusetts, specializing in turning around congregations and helping them to grow. Rev. Nickerson then served as Associate Conference Minister for Evangelism, Vitality and New Church Starts in the Massachusetts Conference, UCC where he started a vitality movement, which produced turnarounds in 20% of the churches and 10 new church starts. Paul now serves as a full-time coach/consultant with his own business, Nickerson Coaching, as well as being a Sr. Associate with Griffith Coaching of Orlando, Florida. Paul works all over the country coaching existing churches and new church starts in many denominations.

SPACE TO SHARE IN NEW HYDE PARK
Hillside United Methodist Church in New Hyde Park has space they would be glad to share with another congregation, school, or not-for-profit agency. Their sanctuary seats 300 and is available Sunday afternoons between 1 and 4 p.m. They also have three classrooms, a children’s room, a small chapel, and a meeting room/library that they imight be able to share Monday through Friday.
For further information, contact Bob Graf at 516-741-5148 .

GREAT SKILLS TO SHARE
Foreign Language Professor, Linguist and Polyglot
will give FREE German and French lessons
in exchange for FREE Golf and Tennis lessons.
She accepts ALL levels, ages and cultures.
Long Island & Forest Hills areas.
Serious inquiries only.
Contact:
Great Skills To Share
P. O. Box 1195
Valley Stream, NY 11582
E-mail: greatskillstoshare@gmail.com

YOUTH DIRECTOR SOUGHT IN HUNTINGTON
Youth Director sought by Old First Presbyterian Church in Huntington.
Enthusiastic, energetic leader of Christian faith; top organizer/interactor/communicator; background in Christian education or teaching/coaching experience helpful. Part-time: 25-30 flexible hrs/wk; salary: $30-35,000/yr. Inquiries/resumes to Pete Fetterolf: pfettero@optonline.net

CHURCH SPACE TO SHARE IN MASSAPEQUA:
The Presbyterian Community Church in Massapequa has space to share with another congregation:
Sanctuary, two levels, seats 225, generally available except Sunday before noon
Fellowship hall/auditorium/gymnasium with kitchen
Club room
Parking lot and street parking for 60 cars (on weekends, additional parking is available)
Several classrooms
This is a large building that can be used for worship, meetings and other gatherings.
We are conveniently located near the Southern State Parkway, Route 135 and Sunrise Highway. Please call Pete LaMassa at 516-316-6571 for more information.

 




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June 2012 Long Island Council of Churches newsletter, The Prelude
 
These items do not appear in the printed, snail-mailed version of this newsletter:
Ideas You Can Use:  Kid-Friendly Food Collection
Why We Need Cross-District High Schools
A New Addition to Our Roster of Guest Preachers
Needed: A Van
First-Time Homebuyers Workshop June 3 in Greenport
Pro Bono Legal Clinic for Special Needs June 6 in Mineola
Foreclosure Consultations in Mineola June 11
 “How To Avoid a Financial Meltdown” Workshop
Learn about Poison Control June 15 at Freeport Pantry
Offered: Medical Equipment,  Electronic Organ
New Recovery Ministry Launched in Massapequa
Interreligious Dialogue June 21 in Franklin Square
 
Many thanks to all of you who attended our Annual Meeting at 1st Presbyterian Church in Smithtown! And particular thanks to Richard Deam and Deamoaks Planning Services for sponsoring this meeting and to the speakers from the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum, Mark Bigelow, Arvind Vora, Kausar Zaman, Raj Singh, and Bill Hecker. Sara Weiss and I will summarize in the July Prelude some of the thoughts they shared on how to pass along your beliefs to the next generation.

FROM OUR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: CAN WE ALL JUST GET ALONG?
One of the more complex conundrums of interreligious work is how to relate to those who claim to be part of a faith community but are generally disowned by it.  Followers of the Rev. Sung Moon may think they are Christian, but most Christians think they are something else. The Ahmadiyya Community claims to be Muslim but other Muslims say they are not. Those who call themselves Messianic Jews believe that they are both Jewish and faithful followers of Jesus, but most Jews say that they cannot be both.

What should we call these groups? The traditional answer, at least for Christians, has been heretics or apostates, terms that are not exactly helpful in promoting interfaith understanding, but neither does it do much good to call them whatever they want to be called.

Some faith communities are not troubled by this question, as Arvind Vora explains elsewhere in this issue of The Prelude. The way that faiths such as Judaism or Christianity define their boundaries often mystifies those on the outside—and even some inside. Rabbi Marc Gellman has explained that the children of Jewish mothers are Jewish, unless they renounce Judaism. But what about those who do not believe they have renounced anything, simply followed a rabbi who might be the Messiah? Nearly all new denominations, sects, and faith communities begin as movements that see themselves as reforming or restoring the tradition they inherited, not leaving or rejecting it. What—or who—determines which sheep have left the flock?

I suspect that Christians and Jews will always see this issue differently. “Who is a Jew?” is a question way above my pay grade, and the issue is made more complex by the fact that the most zealous defenders of boundaries are often held in suspicion themselves. Some of those who are most adamant that Messianic Jews are no longer Jews, for example, are themselves rejected by some Jews, either because they are not Orthodox or because they claim to be Orthodox but think the Lubbavitcher Rebbe was the Messiah.

Sometimes I wonder, as Rodney King asked, “Can we all just get along?” But we know how things turned out for him, the police officers who beat him, and the city in which they lived.  I have come to accept that most Jews will not accept Messianic Jews as Jewish, many Christians insist Mormons are not Christians, and most Muslims cannot embrace Ahmadiyyas as fellow believers. But does that mean we cannot share a dais, a podium, or a meal?

One thing we often do not know about one another is how difficult it may be for others to do something that seems like no big deal to us. The reason a rabbi might refuse to share a forum with leaders of a Messianic synagogue, for example, is not because the latter believe Jesus is the Messiah, but rather because he or she sees these folks as fake rabbis who are pretending to be Jews in order to convert Jews to Christianity. Which is, in fact, sometimes the case: the founder of Jews for Jesus was a Baptist clergyman before he ever started calling himself a rabbi, and his evangelistic techniques were at least a tad deceptive. Perhaps it is wrong to tar all Messianics with the same brush, but Jews have good reason to be suspicious.

Could you share a platform with someone who claims to be from our faith community even if you think they are not?  I might not want members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints to be the only representative of Christianity in a multi-faith educational program—and a regional LDS leader told me he would not want somebody from a renegade polygamist sect that broke away from the LDS to be the sole representative of their history--but that does not mean Mormons should not join the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum as a new religious movement. Personally, I would gladly volunteer if a local LDS church invited the Forum to present a Building Bridges program about how various faith communities practice their faith.

Such an invitation might go a long way toward greater understanding between hosts and guests, as I suspect would be the case if a Messianic synagogue or Ahmadiyya mosque invited the Multi-Faith Forum to speak. Wouldn’t it be nice if a church welcomed a Mormon speaker on the same terms? If a mosque invited the Forum to do a Building Bridges program that might include Bahais and Ahmadiyyas?

Would it confuse people if a Methodist and a Mormon, or a Muslim and an Ahmadiyya were part of the same “Building Bridges” panel? Sure. But Jesus already has a pretty confusing array of followers and we constantly explain to others, “Yes, I am a Christian clergyman, but I am married” or “Yes, I am Christian, but my pastor is a woman.” Exposing an audience to conflicting claims might teach them something important as well as perplexing them.

I do not mean to suggest that this sort of ecumenical or interfaith hospitality is easy, but like it or not, we all compete in a marketplace of ideas and beliefs. Do we have the intestinal fortitude to say what we believe and practice without having a monopoly on the microphone? If not, why should anyone listen to us?

Shalom/Salaam/Shanti/Pax/Jai Jinendra,

Tom
 

FROM THE MULTI-FAITH FORUM: CAN WE LEARN FROM OTHER FAITHS?
By Arvind Vora, Jain, Chair of the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum

Three ancient eastern faiths have roots in present-day India. Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism have evolved with millennium of wisdom and have withstood war, aggression, exploitation, and conversion.

HINDUISM has more than a billion followers but no centralized authority that can issue binding decrees. Today there are half a dozen Hindu places of worship on Long Island, each with a different way of praying, but most Hindus treat each other with respect and would not claim that the others are not Hindu. Three of the most successful movements in USA are:
*The Brahma Kumaris, with their headquarters for the Americas in Great Neck, have a presence in  more than 150 countries--after being in existence for less than one hundred years. The BKs have taken the meditation practice of Hinduism to a new height.
*Swami Narayan movement (also known as BAPS), with a strong, large, and cohesive group of followers, has a strong desire to establish roots in new countries, as can be seen in their monumental temples. Their temples are not only lively and vibrant places of worship but also have become tourist attractions in Atlanta and London.
*Gayatri Pariwar emphasizes one of the most sacred mantras of Hinduism, the Gayatri; those who subscribe to it become part of the Pariwar or family.
There are dozens of other Hindu movements found here, such as Sai Baba, Arsha Vidhya Gurukulam, AMMA’s Satsang, and host of other small or localized places of worships. For Americans, the Vedanta Society was the first exposure to Hinduism, with an electrifying and erudite presentation by Swami Vivekananda at the first Parliament of World Religions in 1893 in Chicago. There are both many Hindus in our area who have roots in India (and whose temples may be called something such as Vedic Center rather than Hindu) and a substantial population of Caribbean Hindus (whose temples usually have “Hindu” in their name). The one common element among all of Hindus is that none of them would say that others are not Hindu or have no right to call themselves Hindu.

 BUDDHISM, with deep roots in several countries for more than a millennium, has won the hearts of more Westerners than any other Eastern faith. Its simplicity and diversity remain great attractions. The Dalai Lama, a Nobel Prize winner and crusader for Tibetans Buddhists’ right to practice their religion in their ancestral home against the mighty power of the Chinese government, is the most famous symbol of both Buddhism and moral conscience. Buddhism has numerous branches and divisions, but few adherent of any tradition would deny their right to be called Buddhist.

JAINISM, the least known and smallest faith community with roots in India, has insisted over the centuries on the futility of violence to achieve desired goals. It proclaims three important principles, AHIMSA(non-violence), ANEKANT(truth and reality are hard to comprehend) and APARIGRHA(nonattachment to living and nonliving.) It has at least five major Panth (branches) – Digambara, Swetambara, Sthankvasi, Terapanth, and Srimad Rajchandra. Mahatma Gandhi, a Hindu who was deeply influenced by his mother’s Jain heritage, used these three principles to claim freedom for millions of his fellow countrymen from British rule without resorting to violence.  Far from ever saying that other Jains are not Jain because they worship in a different way, Jains often visit, pray in, and financially support temples from other traditions, as can be seen at the Jain Center of America in Elmhurst, Queens.
These three ancient faiths teach that we should accept realities that we cannot change and that we should mend fences in our families and society. Perhaps newcomers to America have brought something with them that can help those who have been here a long time.


DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT
Sara C. Weiss, Director of Development
Special thanks go to Richard Deam, President of Deamoak’s Planning Services, for his $2,000 sponsorship for our 2012 Annual Meeting.  Special thanks also go to several board members who gave $2,000, $1000, and $500 sponsorships for Share the Harvest 2012, and to an individual who gave $1,000 for the same.   And finally we thank a former board member for a $3,000 gift.  We believe it’s very important to thank board members for whatever they can give, because it’s often sacrificial. We also thank the following institutions for their gifts:
Hempstead Methodist Church                                    $600 To Be Used Where Most Needed
Long Island Cares                                                      $750 Riverhead Food Center
NY Yearly Meeting/Religious Society of Friends  $1,000 Emergency Food
 
And of course, we thank all our donors who gave less than $500.  It’s all of you that enable us to carry out our ministry to serve Long Island’s most vulnerable citizens.
 
Most Urgent Need
The LICC  started the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum 20 years ago in partnership with Auburn Theological Seminary to promote interreligious tolerance, understanding and cooperation.  Including representatives from the Bahai Faith, the Brahma Kumaris, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduisms, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Native American Spirituality, Sikhism, and Unitarian Universalism, the Forum is  project without parallel anywhere else—and if you do not know who all these people are, you may need the Forum’s help, because they may well be your new neighbors.  Its volunteers have done more than 270 interfaith education programs, ranging from Sunday school classrooms in Centerport to the Parliament of World Religions.  Not only does the MFF’s help its audiences to better understand their neighbors and co-workers, it also helps adherents traditions gain a better understanding of their own traditions. Often, we do not fully understand what we believe or why we do what we do until we try to explain it to someone else. 
 
Among the presentations we do are multi-faith festivals at public schools, where the mere presence of someone from the same faith can help students feel less isolated. At a multi-faith festival we did for a high school, we learned that a Sikh teenager who wore the distinctive head covering of his faith had been feeling extremely uncomfortable, self-conscious and isolated. He was astonished to walk into the gym where the multi-faith festival was taking place and to see several Sikhs wearing turbans.  He was even more amazed when he saw other students being wrapped in turbans and then saw the assistant principal walking through the hall wearing a turban. 
 
The Multi-Faith Forum is severely underfunded, however, and we need donations to support our work through the LI MFF.  Please help us continue to promote religious tolerance through the educational programs the MFF conducts throughout the year and throughout the Island.
 
Memorial/Tribute Gifts
A great way to remember a loved one, whether living or deceased, is to give a memorial or tribute gift in his/her name.  In your letter accompanying such a gift, please tell us who the gift is in memory or tribute to, and who is giving the gift.  We will send a thank you letter to the contributor and to the family of the loved one in accordance with your instructions.  Please send your contribution to the LICC, attention Sara Weiss.  If you have any questions, call Sara for further information at 516-565-0290, ext. 207.  Naming and Tribute opportunities are also available for our programs.  Please call Sara for a list.  We also have planned giving opportunities that will sustain these programs in perpetuity.
 
IDEAS YOU CAN USE:
Kid Friendly Food Collection, Anonymous Pledges, Recycled Paper
Families who usually depend on breakfast and lunch programs offered at school to feed their children need extra food to provide these additional meals for their children over the summer. With this in mind, the Sunday School students at Wantagh Memorial Congregational Church is having a kid-friendly food collection on urging people to observe Children’s Day, June 10th.  They explain: “What we are looking for is breakfast and lunch foods that kids like to eat, such as peanut butter and jelly, cereal, Spaghetti O’s, snacks and treats. Of course, we do appreciate all donations, no matter whether they are kid friendly or not.”

Anonymous Pledges
St. John’s Lutheran Church in Port Jefferson recent began asking its members to pledge anonymously to support the ministry of the church. Members place in a sealed envelope the amount of money they intend to give, an amount that is “between you and God,” and the church office mails these envelopes sometime mid-year, still unopened, as a reminder of their good intentions.  While donations are recorded throughout the year for income tax purposes, and a yearly letter thanking them for their gifts, no one receives a letter from any financial secretary chiding them for falling short of their promise.  The church has found that more people are willing to pledge when the amount is between them and the Almighty, and donations have increased. The Rev. Clare Nesmith, a member of our Board and pastor of Christ Episcopal Church in Babylon, reports that her home church has a similar, entirely positive experience.
Has your congregation tried anything like this? And did you put the LICC in your budget this year?

Recycled Paper
Do you use recycled paper in your congregation? If so, why not tell folks about this small step you are taking to care for God’s good creation? Port Washington United Methodist Church, for example, notes on their Sunday worship bulletin “Recycled Paper, 100% post-consumer.” Go thou and do likewise.
 

WORTH QUOTING
Why We Need Cross-District High Schools
“Eradicating entrenched segregation is a daunting challenge. But a good first step lies in easy reach: creating regional high schools of excellence. These schools would draw high-achieving students from across district lines, and could be created in ways that would not replicate the segregation that already exists.
The benefits are both obvious and significant. The schools would offer upward mobility to deserving kids in failing community schools. Nurture the smarts that employers need to grow a high-tech economy. And create high-profile oases of diversity on our too-segregated island.
It's an idea whose time has long since come. It was championed by the first Governor Cuomo, who recognized it as a vital step in building our regional economy. In recent decades, other regions have acted, while Long Island has not.”
--Nancy Rauch Douzinas, What Every Long Islander Should Know, May 1012,
www.rauchfoundation.org
 
New York, the City of God
“While New York has a reputation for godlessness, both city and state actually have higher rates of membership in organized religion than the country as a whole. . . . Even higher numbers specifically for the tri-state region put it in the top 9 percent of urban areas in terms of religiosity, ahead of Salt Lake City and Little Rock.”
--Julie Byrne, Msgr. Thomas J. Hartman Chair of Catholic Studies at Hofstra University, Newsday April 8, 2012
 
Misunderstanding the New Testament
“Even today, people sometimes base their understandings of the New Testament on passages that we do not have in the original wording.”
--Bart D. Ehrman, Lost Christianities: Christian Scripture and the Battles Over Authentication
 
DID YOU KNOW?
*Client Choice at the LICC Pantry
The LICC’s Freeport Emergency Food Center, the largest of our food pantries, has now shifted entirely to “client choice.” Rather than bagging up groceries for our guests in advance, our staff and volunteers fill bags based on the items guests choose among available items. And we have been giving our guests more choices in Hempstead and Riverhead as we try to find ways to implement “client choice” where we have space limitations. Client choice reduces waste and helps our guests to get the food they really need.
Of course, we need your continued donations and financial support to make sure there are enough items on the shelf for our guests to choose. The best times to drop off donations are Monday-Friday, 9:00 to 4:30 in Hempstead (in Christ’s 1st Presbyterian Church, 516-565-0290) and & Riverhead (407 Osborne Avenue at Lincoln, 631-727-2210) or Monday-Friday, 10 to 4 in Freeport (450 N. Main Street, 516-868-4989), or to at any LICC meeting or event. Donations of toiletries, personal care items, school supplies, small household goods, and shopping bags also are always welcome at all of our locations.
*CWS Blankets Sent to the North Fork
Church World Service, our partner in ecumenical relief efforts, recently shipped blankets to
Mattituck Presbyterian Church for the homeless they serve through their “John’s Place” program. For more info about this project, please contact Caren Heacock at
631-298-4145.
*Pan-Methodism Ecumenism
The General Conference of the United Methodist Church has voted to enter into full communion with the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, the African Union Methodist Protestant Church and the Union American Methodist Episcopal Church.  The denominations, which already cooperate on issues such as children and poverty, will now have an opportunity to pursue a broader mission agenda together.
*Tours to India
Grace Simonette, a member of the LICC’s Dialogue and Development Committees, leads tours of India, with an emphasis on religious sites and leaders.  Her next trip will be a 15-day journey leaving Oct 12. For more information and a detailed itinerary, visit www.indiajourneywithgrace.com or call 631-265-5823.
 
MORE ABOUT YOUTH SAVER BANK ACCOUNTS
With banking fees in flux, where can young adults find “youth saver” accounts, credit union or bank branches on campus, no-fee checking accounts, and similar options that encourage youth and young adults to save money and manage their finances responsibly. Here’s my latest compilation of such options:
*People’s United Bank (which took over the Bank of Smithtown) offers free Student Plus Checking to all full-time college students and free Plus Checking to anyone who has their paycheck directly deposited (or to anyone 65 or older), and they offer no-fee savings accounts to everyone with a checking account. For more information, call 1-800-772-1090.
*New York Community Bank offers “My Community Free Checking” with no minimum balance required, a free VISA check card, ATM card, a rewards program, and $100 in gift cards for new accounts. For more info, call 877-786-6560. 
*TD Bank offers free checking and savings accounts to full-time college students and free Young Saver accounts for those 18 and younger if their parents bring in their child’s Social Security number. 
*Bethpage Federal Credit Union is offering to put $50 in a Youth Saver Account (now paying 4% interest) when an adult opens a no-fee, no-minimum-balance checking account.
*Teachers Federal Credit Union (which is now open to all Long Islanders) offers free checking accounts to those who open a savings account with at least $1. Visit www.teachersfcu.org or call 631-698-7000 for more info.
 
Some banks and credit unions have branches on campus, which is another way to encourage financial responsibility among students. Suffolk Teachers FCU has satellite operations at something like eight schools in Suffolk, for example, and TD Bank has a full-fledged branch in the student union at Hofstra University.
 
DEALING WITH STUDENT DEBT
The New York Times recently reported that student loan debt in America now totals over $1 trillion dollars, and some people face college loan payments as high as a mortgage. Indeed, many young and youngish adults are rejected for mortgages because they owe so much in education loans.  There is also no statute of limitations on past-due student loans:  some people have their Social Security checks garnished to repay them.
There are some options for coping with crushing student debt. Loan consolidation through Sallie Mae can lower the interest rate borrowers pay to as little as 3%. Those who undertake community service jobs after graduation can have federal student loans forgiven. And there are ways to avoid running up student debt in the first place.

The LICC offers seminars on how to manage your money well--and not get ripped off on loans. Our presentations usually run an hour to 90 minutes, and we will tailor it to the needs of your audience. We can do shorter programs, for example, for a college class, campus ministry group, or youth group and their parents. They could be a great addition to your congregation’s stewardship campaign, helping people to think faithfully about our stewardship of all our resources. Each presentation is shaped around the needs of the audience and we are prepared to address a wide variety of topics. We would also be glad to do presentations for religious leaders on how to manage a congregation’s money more effectively, reduce expenses, pay for energy conservation measures, etc. 

The LICC will provide speakers and  educational materials—all you need to provide is coffee and noshes. Thanks to generous funding for this effort this year from Astoria Federal Savings, Bank of America, Ridgewood Savings Bank, TD Charitable Foundation, and Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, there is no charge for this program. For more information, please visit www.ncccusa.org/ecmin/licc/managemoney.html. To request a program, please call 516-565-0290, ext. 206, or e-mail tomgoodhue@optonline.net.
 
AN ADDITION TO OUR ROSTER OF GUEST PREACHERS
Our Executive Director, the Rev. Tom Goodhue, has some Sundays available for guest preaching this summer and fall You can reach him at tomgoodhue@optonline.net or 516-565-0290, ext. 206.  For a listing of other pinch-hitters and information about the “going rate” for guest preachers and substitute organists, please visit www.ncccusa.org/ecmin/licc/guestpreachers.html

And here’s a new addition to our roster of pinch-hitters:
Sajid Christopher, the head of the Human Friends Organization International, a not-for-profit that supports victims of religious persecution, is available for guest preaching or speaking about the plight of Christians in Pakistan. He would be happy to travel anywhere on Long Island. You can reach him at sajeranjha@hotmail.com or 516-368-2277.

A NEW ADDITION TO OUR ROSTER OF PASTORAL COUNSELORS
*The Rev. David Henry, pastor of the Freeport United Methodist Church, is a Board certified Clinical Chaplain, Pastoral Counselor and a newly-minted Diplomate in Supervision under the auspices of CPSP. He is available for individual pastoral counseling and also to train those who desire clinical credit hours towards their own certification. He can be reached at 516-455-2974 or 516-378-0659.
The complete list of pastoral counselors, chaplains, and campus ministers on Long Island whom we know is included in our Directory of Long Island Churches & Synagogues.  We mail this directory free of charge to our member congregations, the Friends of the LICC, and our major donors. If you have not received your copy, this may be a sign that you need to do the paperwork to officially join!. If you have any questions, please contact Sara Weiss at saraweiss@optonline.net or 516-565-0290, ext. 207.

WHAT TO DO WHEN A CHILD DISCLOSES ABUSE
The Office for the Protection of Children and Young People recently printed some helpful suggestions in The Long Island Catholic:
Remain calm.
Allow the child to tell the story without interruption.
Reassure the child. No blame.
Support the child. He or she has done the right thing in telling you.
Reinforce safety.
Do not criticize the alleged abuser.
Report the abuse to local law enforcement.
Let law enforcement do the investigation.
 
NEEDED/OFFERED
Needed:
*A Van
The LICC could use a new van for our emergency food program? Have one in good condition that you don’t need? Want to donate it and receive a tax donation—as well as our gratitude?
 
Offered:
*First-Time Homebuyers Workshop June 3 In Greenport
The LICC is offering a workshop for the Southold Land Trust on how to save money to buy a home for the first time--and how to find an affordable home on Long Island. It will be at St. Agnes Catholic Church (Front & 6th Streets in Greenport, on the south side of Main Road/Route 25) on Sunday, June 3, from 1 to 3. Speakers will include attorney Mike Ferruggia, Rich Murphy from Wells Fargo, and Pedro Magalhaes from Bethpage FCU have volunteered. The President of the Land Trust will also speak briefly about their efforts to create affordable housing on the North Fork. All are welcome.
*Pro Bono Legal Clinic for Special Needs June 6 in Mineola
The Nassau County Bar Assn. and New York State Bar Assn. Elder Law Section are offering a free legal clinic on Wednesday, June 6, from 10:00 to noon at the Bar Assn., 15th & West Streets in Mineola, a block south of Old Country Road. Bring your legal questions about Social Security, Medicaid, supplemental needs trusts, guardianships, special education law, wills, and such. There is no charge for these consultations with attorney members of the Bar Association knowledgeable about special needs legal issues, but advance registration is required. To register or request further information, please call 516-747-4070. Attorneys who are bi-lingual in Spanish, Russian, Haitian Creole, Korean, Chinese, Hindi, French, American Sign Language and many other languages are available if you make a request when making your reservation.
*Foreclosure Consultations in Mineola June 11
 The Nassau County Bar Association is offering a free Mortgage Foreclosure Consultation Clinic for Nassau residents on Monday, June 11, from 3 to 6 p.m. at the Bar Assn., 15th & West Streets in Mineola, a block south of Old Country Road. Individual consultations are available with housing counselors, representatives from Nassau/Suffolk Law Services, La Fuerza Unida, and the Nassau County Homeownership Center, and bankruptcy attorneys from the Bar Association. There is no charge for these consultations, but you must make a reservation in advance by calling 516-747-4070. Consultations are available in Spanish and several other languages upon request.
*How To Avoid a Financial Meltdown  Workshop
Friday, June 8, at 10 a.m.
Family Service League
790 Park Ave, Huntington, NY 11743
and
Friday, June 15, at 10 a.m.
 Family Service League
 208 Roanoke Avenue, Riverhead, NY 11901
Issues to be discussed at this FREE WORKSHOP will include Debt Management, Crisis Budgeting and Foreclosure Prevention   
To register call Pilar Moya-Mancera (631)427-3700 X264
or email pmoyamancera@fsl-li.org                    
·       Learn how to prioritize expenses in times of crisis
·      Resources and tips to reduce housing, utility and
                       food expenses
Which debts should get paid first
·      What to do when debt collectors cross the line
 
And remember that the LICC offers seminars on how to manage your money well--and not get ripped off on loans. Our presentations usually run an hour to 90 minutes, and we will tailor it to the needs of your audience. We can do shorter programs, for example, for a college class, campus ministry group, or youth group and their parents. They could be a great addition to your congregation’s stewardship campaign, helping people to think faithfully about our stewardship of all our resources. Each presentation is shaped around the needs of the audience and we are prepared to address a wide variety of topics. We would also be glad to do presentations for religious leaders on how to manage a congregation’s money more effectively, reduce expenses, pay for energy conservation measures, etc. 

We are doing one, for example on how to save money to buy a home for the first time and how to find an affordable home. This workshop will be at St. Agnes Catholic Church (Front & 6th Streets in Greenport, on the south side of Main Road/Route 25) on Sunday, June 3, from 1 to 3.
The LICC will provide speakers and educational materials—all you need to provide is coffee and noshes. Thanks to generous funding for this effort this year from Astoria Federal Savings, Bank of America, Ridgewood Savings Bank, TD Charitable Foundation, and Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, there is no charge for this program. For more information, please visit www.ncccusa.org/ecmin/licc/managemoney.html. To request a program, please e-mail tomgoodhue@optonline.net or call 516-565-0290, ext. 206.

*Learn about Poison Control June 15 at Freeport Pantry
Eduardo Torres from the New York City Poison Control Center will be at the LICC’s Emergency Food Center in Freeport (450 N. Main St.) on Friday, June 15. Drop by anytime between 11:00 and 3:30 to learn how to keep your home safe from toxins—and pick up some non-toxic freebies.

*Medical Equipment 
Linda Tomppert in Port Washington has an electric Nebulizer inhaler, a Hand Haler device with capsules, and a large box of gauze, bandages, and other wound care supplies. Please email lindamt@att.net if you or someone you know needs it.
A fellow member of Port Washington United Methodist Church has a wheelchair to give away.  Please email jpickow@aol.com if you or someone you know needs it.
Ranjana Shah has a walker, a portable bathtub bar, and a shower chair in Melville that she would like to give away to anyone who needs them. You can reach her at ranjana@optonline.net

*Electronic Organ
Mary Ella Moeller of First Presbyterian Church in East Hampton has a small electronic organ that her late husband, Jim, played, and she wants to find a good home for it. It is a 1993 Yamaha Electone EL-90, with self-contained speakers, two 4-octave keyboards and a 1½- octave pedal board, and has the instruction books and discs. It is suitable for a home, hall, or small church. It could go to the right person for just the cost of removing it! Mary Ella can be reached at maryellamoeller@gmail.com or 631-324-0471.

*Multi-Faith Education
The Long Island Council of Churches and Auburn Theological Seminary launched the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum in 1993 to help people in our area understand their neighbors. The LIMFF unites hundreds of Islanders from eleven different faith communities and many races, nationalities, and cultures. Our volunteers represent the Bahai Faith, the Brahma Kumaris, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduisms, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Native American Spirituality, Sikhism, and Unitarian Universalism. If you are not familiar with all these traditions or did not know that they are your neighbors, you may need a Building Bridges program! The Forum has presented more than 270 programs in schools, workplaces, and houses of worship, for audiences ranging from ten to 1100. While most of our programs are done in English, we have also been able to accommodate requests for Spanish language and bi-lingual presentations and could try other languages as well. The Forum has also developed a fun game-show format called “What’s My Faith.” For more information, please visit www.liccny.org. To request a presentation, contact Bernice Suplee at jbsuplee@aol.com or (631) 665-7033.
Michael Fairchild, who produced the half-hour “Faiths of Long Island” video for the Long Island Multi-Faith Forum has loaded it onto YouTube. You can see the video at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ncnn5pd6Gu4 and
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOsL0LaClgU
           
DOING A BLOOD DRIVE?
We haven’t received info yet from Long Island Blood Services about collection dates in June, July, or August, but if your congregation is doing a blood drive, we’d be glad to pass the word! We have heard directly from these churches:
*Monday, June 11, 2:45-8:345 p.m. Garden City Community Church (245 Stewart Avenue). Email calced@verizon.net or call 516-334-6325 for further info or to make an appointment.
*Tuesday, June 19, 3:30 to 9 p.m. Grace United Methodist Church in Lindenhurst will have a blood drive at 515 Wellwood Ave. (the entrance is at the corner of Liberty Ave. & 1st Street). If your last donation was before April 24, you may be eligible to give “the gift of life” on June 19.
 
ADS & ANNOUNCEMENTS

PRC ad_0001

NEW RECOVERY MINISTRY LAUNCHED IN MASSAPEQUA
Community United Methodist Church in Massapequa has launched a worship service focused on recovery and healing from addiction and other life struggles. These services at the first & third Monday of each month at 7 p.m. are part of a wider “Journey into New Life”  ministry. This service is led by the Rev. Bob Gunn. Bob is ordained in the UCC, currently has a full-time psychotherapy practice, and is himself in recovery for 30 years. He formerly served the UCC church in Rockville Center. He has also led recovery worship in Manhattan. We also have a dedicated Recovery Ministry team made up of lay persons who are working with Bob on this effort.
The church is located at 100 Park Blvd. in  Massapequa, between Sunrise Highway and Merrick Road, on the west side of Park Blvd.  For more info, please call 516-541-7008


 

Interreligious dialogue
Exploring and understanding other faiths
“Three Faiths, One God:
Judaism, Christianity, Islam”
As seen on public television nationwide
 
The Wesley United Methodist Church
invites our community
to engage in an interreligious dialogue
to deepen our understanding
of the Abrahamic faiths.
“This ground-braking documentary compares the similarities and differences in religious beliefs and practices that Islam has with Christianity and Judaism. It also examines how people of good will in the Abrahamic faith communities are coming to terms with historical conflicts that impact their lives today, the crisis of the fundamentalist approach to religious pluralism, and the tearing down barriers to understanding and respect.”
Wesley Church is located at:
619 Fenworth Blvd. (corner of Dogwood Ave.)
Franklin Square, NY 11010.
Thursday,  June 21 & 28 at 7:30 p.m.
Contact us at
wesleyfsumc@yahoo.com or 516-481-1797
or visit our webpage http://wesleyunitedmethodistchurchfranklinsq.blogspot.com/

 




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LI Council of Churches
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Dear Friend,

How often over the past four years have you complained about the power of America's richest 1%?

The 2008 financial meltdown that began the Great Recession accomplished one good thing: it called attention to the enormous disparities in wealth and power that now shape America's economic and political landscape. These alarming and growing disparities will be the focus of the second annual LI Jobs with Justice conference, "Working But Still Poor: Organizing for Economic Justice on Long Island," on Friday, March 30, 8:30-2:30 at the Tuoro Law Center in Central Islip. The conference, a call to political action for people of conscience like you, will feature such prominent Long Island leaders such as Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, Congressman Tim Bishop, Nancy Rauch Douzinas, President of the Rauch Foundation which publishes the highly-regarded LI Index and John Durso, President of the LI Federation of Labor. There are also nine interactive workshops that address economic injustices on LI, many featuring academic specialists a leading advocates. The conference brochure and registration materials are attached.

Please join us on March 30th as our complaints, our anger, our frustration become an action plan for economic justice on LI.

In solidarity,

Dick

Richard Koubek, PhD
Community Outreach Coordinator
Long Island Jobs with Justice
631-499-6725.

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 "War destroys. And we must cry out for peace.
Peace sometimes gives the idea of stillness, but it is never stillness.
It is always an active peace.
I think that everyone must be committed in the matter of peace,
to do everything that they can,
what I can do from here.
Peace is the language we must speak."
Pope Francis

 

 

 
                                            ~Pope FRANCIS